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817 Milam Street
Houston, TX, 77002
United States

(713)-223-5900

SunsetBodyWorks is a Day Spa located in Downtown Houston with a waling distance from many hotel such as hotel Icon, Westin Hotel, Magnolia hotel, Lancaster Hotel and JW Marriot Hotel. Our services include couples massage, facial,  body toning, spa party and other similar services!

Established 1997, SunsetBodyWorks is downtown Houston's leading day spa with a reputation for outstanding services, products and expertise. We are located in a cozy two story suite located on the second floor of the Rice Lofts. We offer best deep tissue massage, couples massage ,spa package,spa party, microcurrent anti-aging facial, skin care, waxing,  hair up-do's, nail services and more. 

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Filtering by Tag: bodywork

Massage Therapy

Sunsetbodyworks Day Spa Houston

Light
Light massage includes Reiki, Swedish, Energy Work and Spa massages. This style of massage can offer profound results or simply relax you. Spa massage is usually fairly light and designed to relax you. For people new to massage, this is a good first step. Most light massage addresses the whole body at one session. It is the spa industry that has been at the fore front of massage education. Until recently, only the elite knew the value of massage. Most royal families receive massage daily.


Medium
Medium massage may leave light bruising after completion. Professionals who do medium massage are well trained and usually have a great deal of experience. You should never feel sharp pain during a massage. Discomfort is normal momentarily. You should surely feel younger and livelier after a day or two. You will find some medium massage in spa settings, however, independant practitioners are more likely to practice medium massage. Between light and deep, medium massage still addresses the whole body in one session.


Deep
Deep massage is for athletes, people who do heavy work and those in accute pain. Again, sharp pain is contrary to healing. Bruising is normal after the first few massage sessions. You may be sore for a day or two like after a good work out. Your body will change dramatically after the third or fourth session. Be the time you have had six or seven sessions, you will be much more flexible and will understand the true value of regular massage. Born in ancient China 6,000 years ago, massage was used as a form of healthcare. The ancient form of massage called “Tuina” is the foundation of many deep muscle techniques. “Canadian Deep Muscle Massage” was born in the late 1800′s. “Rolfing” was born in 1959 at Eslan in California. Each of these techniques addresses only one area of the body at any one time. These practitioners are usually very well trained. Again, sharp pain is not to be acceptable. Discomfort is certainly normal.

Reflexology

Sunsetbodyworks Day Spa Houston

This technique is based on a system of points on the hands, feet and ears that correspond, or "reflex," to other areas of the body. Similar in theory to accupressure, reflexologists believe that applying appropriate pressure to these points stimulates the flow of energy, thus helping to relieve pain or blockages throughout the entire body. A very pleasurable form of bodywork, reflexology is also used to ease stress and promote relaxation.

TCM: Traditional Chinese Medicine

Sunsetbodyworks Day Spa Houston

     Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the oldest continuous systems of medicine in history, with recorded instances dating as far back as two thousand years before the birth of Christ. This is in sharp contrast to the American or Western forms of health care, which have been in existence for a much shorter time span (the American Medical Association, the largest health care member association in the United States, was formed in 1847, some 3,800 years after the first mention of traditional Chinese medicine).

     Chinese medicine is quite complex and can be difficult for some people to comprehend. This is because TCM is based, at least in part, on the Daoist belief that we live in a universe in which everything is interconnected. What happens to one part of the body affects every other part of the body. The mind and body are not viewed separately, but as part of an energetic system. Similarly, organs and organ systems are viewed as interconnected structures that work together to keep the body functioning.

     Many of the concepts emphasized in traditional Chinese medicine have no true counterpart in Western medicine. One of these concepts is qi (pronounced "chi"), which is considered a vital force or energy responsible for controlling the workings of the human mind and body. Qi flows through the body via channels, or pathways, which are called meridians. There are a total of 20 meridians: 12 primary meridians, which correspond to specific organs, organ systems or functions, and eight secondary meridians. Imbalances in the flow of qi cause illness; correction of this flow restores the body to balance. Other concepts (such as the Yin/Yang and Five Element Theories) are equally important in order to have a true grasp of traditional Chinese medicine.

     Many people often equate the practice of acupuncture with the practice of traditional Chinese medicine. This is not entirely true. While acupuncture is the most often practiced component of traditional Chinese medicine, it is simply that – a component, an important piece of a much larger puzzle. Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses several methods designed to help patients achieve and maintain health. Along with acupuncture, TCM incorporates adjunctive techniques such as acupressure and moxibustion; manipulative and massage techniques such as tuina and gua sha; herbal medicine; diet and lifestyle changes; meditation; and exercise (often in the form of qigong or tai chi).

     Traditional Chinese medicine should not also be confused with "Oriental medicine." Whereas traditional Chinese medicine is considered a standardized version of the type of Chinese medicine practice before the Chinese Revolution, Oriental medicine is a catch-all phrase for the styles of acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage and exercise that have been developed and practice not only in Asia, but world-wide.

     Although the principles of traditional Chinese medicine may be difficult for some to comprehend, there is little doubt of TCM's effectiveness. Several studies have reported on traditional Chinese medicine's success in treating a wide range of conditions, from nausea and vomiting to skin disorders, tennis elbow and back pain. Many Western-trained physicians have begun to see the benefits traditional Chinese medicine has to offer patients and now include acupuncture — at least on a limited basis -- as part of their practice. More Americans are also using acupuncture, herbal remedies and other components of traditional Chinese medicine than ever before. The reasons for this vary, but the increasing interest in, and use of, TCM is due in large part to its effectiveness, affordability and lack of adverse side-effects compared to Western medicine.

     Listed below are some of the most well-known concepts in traditional Chinese medicine, along with information on TCM and acupuncture schools, titles and organizations. Clicking on a term will direct you to a new page with information on that particular subject.

Acupressure

Qigong

Acupuncture

Reiki

Asian Bodywork Therapy

Shiatsu

Cupping

Tai Chi

Electroacupuncture

Tuina

Five Element Theory

Yin and Yang Theory

Moxibustion

Acupuncture Organizations

NADA Protocol

Acupuncture Regulatory Agencies

Pulse Diagnosis

Acupuncture/TCM Schools

Qi, Jing and Shen

Acupuncture Titles and Abbreviations

Aromatherapy

Sunsetbodyworks Day Spa Houston

Aromatherapy is a natural adjunct to massage and bodywork. The effects of pure essential oils have been well documented in research conducted for the cosmetic and food industries -- the largest users of botanical extracts.

But the essences also work on the mind and, thus, the emotions, and have an effect on the spiritual level, as well. Massage therapists can positively affect many levels during a massage or bodywork treatment by adding essential oils to our cold pressed massage oil, or have a blend that is diffused into the air. Remember to always dilute essential oils before applying to the skin.

Some of the most commonly used essential oils and suggested blends are described below:

CHAMOMILE (Anthemus nobilis). Distilled from dried flowers, chamomile's familiar apple-like scent is found in herbal teas and cosmetic products. Chamomile is used for pain, inflammation, headache, insomnia, stomach distress, skin irritation and infection, and relieves symptoms of PMS. It is an extremely calming oil in the sedative category that is useful to relieve anger.

EUCALYPTUS (Eucalyptus globulus). Distilled from a tree indigenous to Australia, eucalyptus is a powerful decongestant. It is good for flu and sinus conditions, protection from bacterial and viral infections, and it cools the emotions and clears the mind. Use in low doses. One drop in boiling water is a powerful inhalation for congestion due to colds and flu.

GERANIUM (Pelargonium graveolens). Another scent familiar from cosmetic products, Geranium is an anti-inflammatory that assists circulation and relieves anxiety. It relieves neuralgia, stress related conditions, is helpful for both menopause and PMS, and has numerous applications for skin. Geranium is also a pleasant mosquito repellant.

GRAPEFRUIT (Citrus paradisi). Expelled from the rind of the fruit, this essence is known for having a euphoric effect. It also stimulates the lymphatic and digestive systems and relieves simple water retention. Grapefruit will ease the desire to overeat and helps in detoxification.

JUNIPER (Juniperus communis). Distilled from the berry, juniper is a powerful detoxification agent. It relieves simple water retention, overworked and overstressed muscles, and is uplifting to the spirit.

LAVENDER (Lavandula angustifolia). Often considered the one essential oil to have if you can have only one, lavender has extensive properties, including relief of pain, muscle spasm, high blood pressure, insomnia, headache, anxiety, depression, burns, colds and flu. Lavender is the principal sedative oil, but overuse can cause it to become a stimulant.

PEPPERMINT (Mentha piperita). The refreshing, familiar aroma of peppermint is clearing to the mind and emotions. Peppermint relieves headache, muscle pain, sinus, colds and flu, painful feet, and digestive difficulty.

ROSEMARY (Rosmarinus officinalus). Known as the principal stimulant, the essential oil of rosemary relieves pain, headache and promotes circulation while it assists digestion and detoxification.


BLENDS

Chamomile, geranium and grapefruit - Soothing and uplifting; helps relieve PMS.

Chamomile, lavender and grapefruit - Relieves pain, anxiety and insomnia.

Grapefruit, juniper and rosemary - Stimulates circulation and digestion; relieves jetlag.

Lavender, rosemary and juniper - An all purpose blend for pain relief and detoxification after sports massage.

Peppermint, rosemary and geranium - Relieves pain; uplifts and strengthens.

Sources:

  • Davis, Patricia. Aromatherapy, A-Z.
  • Lawless, Julia. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils.
  • Mojay, Gabriel. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit.
  • Sheppard-Hanger, Sylla. The Aromatherapy Practitioners Manual, Vols. I and II.

Shellie Enteen has been an aromatherapist for more than 12 years and teaches continuing education courses in aromatherapy for massage. Shellie is a South Florida regional director of the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), author of Inside Aromatherapy: How to Recognize and Offer High-Quality Aromatherapy, and owner of Aroma Magic, Inc., which provides pure, therapeutic essential oils. Contact Shellie via her Web site www.astralessence.com or e-mail shellie@astralessence.com .

 

Intro to Massage Therapy

Sunsetbodyworks Day Spa Houston

Massage is one of the oldest healing arts: Chinese records dating back 3,000 years document its use; the ancient Hindus, Persians and Egyptians applied forms of massage for many ailments; and Hippocrates wrote papers recommending the use of rubbing and friction for joint and circulatory problems. Today, the benefits of massage are varied and far-reaching. As an accepted part of many physical rehabilitation programs, massage therapy has also proven beneficial for many chronic conditions, including low back pain, arthritis, bursitis, fatigue, high blood pressure, diabetes, immunity suppression, infertility, smoking cessation, depression, and more. And, as many millions will attest, massage also helps relieve the stress and tension of everyday living that can lead to disease and illness.

 

So What Is It Exactly?
Massage, bodywork and somatic therapies are defined as the application of various techniques to the muscular structure and soft tissues of the human body. Specifically:

Massage: The application of soft-tissue manipulation techniques to the body, generally intended to reduce stress and fatigue while improving circulation. The many variations of massage account for several different techniques.

Bodywork: Various forms of touch therapies that may use manipulation, movement, and/or repatterning to affect structural changes to the body.

Somatic: Meaning “of the body.” Many times this term is used to denote a body/mind or whole-body approach as distinguished from a physiology-only or environmental perspective.

There are more than 250 variations of massage, bodywork, and somatic therapies and many practitioners utilize multiple techniques. The application of these techniques may include, but is not limited to, stroking, kneading, tapping, compression, vibration, rocking, friction, and pressure to the muscular structure or soft tissues of the human body. This may also include non-forceful passive or active movement and/or application of techniques intended to affect the energetic systems of the body. The use of oils, lotions, and powders may also be included to reduce friction on the skin.

Please note: Massage, bodywork and somatic therapies specifically exclude diagnosis, prescription, manipulation or adjustments of the human skeletal structure, or any other service, procedure or therapy which requires a license to practice orthopedics, physical therapy, podiatry, chiropractic, osteopathy, psychotherapy, acupuncture, or any other profession or branch of medicine.